DOE Awards $47 Million to Offshore Wind

by Henry Kaplan | May 09, 2014 |

 

The DOE announced this week that they will be giving grants to offshore wind projects of the coasts of New Jersey, Virginia, and Oregon. All together they’ll be giving the three projects $47 million.

The Energy Department says that they’re chipping in to help create a competitive offshore wind industry in the U.S., saying that these projects will “help further lower costs, drive greater performance and clear hurdles to installing more utility-scale turbines in U.S. waters.”

The DOE’s announcement gave some more details about each of the three projects:

Fishermen’s Energy will install five 5-megawatt direct-drive wind turbines approximately three miles off the coast of Atlantic City, New Jersey. This project will utilize an innovative, U.S.-developed twisted jacket foundation that is simpler and less expensive to manufacture and install than traditional offshore wind foundations.  Fishermen’s project will act as a laboratory for researchers to learn about offshore wind and investigate interactions between turbines.

Principle Power will install five 6-megawatt direct-drive wind turbines approximately 18 miles off the coast of Coos Bay, Oregon. The U.S.-developed WindFloat semi-submersible floating foundation will be installed in water more than 1,000 feet deep, demonstrating an innovative solution for deep water wind turbine projects and  lowering costs by simplifying installation and eliminating the need for highly specialized ships. More than 60 percent of U.S. offshore wind resources are found in deep waters, including the entirety of the West Coast. Deploying offshore wind technologies for deeper water can help capture resources that are found in waters too deep for traditional bottom-mounted foundations.

Dominion Virginia Power will install two 6-megawatt direct-drive wind turbines 26 miles off the coast of Virginia Beach, utilizing a U.S.-designed twisted jacket foundation. Dominion’s project will demonstrate installation, operation and maintenance methods for wind turbines located far from shore. Additionally, the Dominion project will install and test a hurricane-resilient design to ensure that offshore wind facilities placed in hurricane-prone U.S. waters are reliable, safe, and cost-effective.

All three projects aim to provide electricity by 2017.


Leave a comment